Africans Are Developing The Art Of Writing And Blogging

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As an instructor in the College of Education and Urban Studies at Edward Waters College, the instructional goal is to reach students to make learning relevant, engaging, fun and helping students to apply to life not just academic lessons.

There are many African students studying at HBCUs in America, they wish to prepare themselves to gain as much education as possible then return and run their companies in technology, education, banking, commerce, trade, finance and the dynamic other areas of study.

African students look at education so different than African Americans, that is why there is a disconnection with African students and African American. Given assessment, African students look at it as just another hurdle to overcome.

African American students may moan, grip and not see the assessment just as it is, a test to overcome.

African students are confident and mature in their outlook on school, while African Americans do not make any connection and see it as a hindrance to other pursuits that have nothing to do with success in life.

These are just my observations and cannot be characterized for the majority of both these groups, but the assessments tell a story and send a strong signal.

Tests do not judge the success of living away from home, tests do not determine the career success of students, it is a gauge of academic achievement and growth; there is more to it than just assessments are taken on a computer. This is why engagement, exposure, hands-on and student lead instruction is vital anywhere in the world.

Students need to understand the reasons for being a good reader, why comprehension is important, the value of grammar and the engagement of networking and collaboration.

Accessing videos from YouTube, that contain lessons learned from Chinua Achebe a Poet, Writer, Mentor, Political and Community Activists; involved in the community he serves and provides a foundation why education is valuable.

The growing TEDX and TEDTALKs allows African across the diaspora to share their thoughts, dreams, and challenges of a united and progressive Africa.

It is important to go beyond just interpretation, understanding, and application of speaking, it is important to know how to put these pieces of education, technology, commerce, trade, natural resources and build a knowledge-based society to use to grow African communities and empower African children for generations to come. “African children need to be taught how to be producers.


“African children need to be taught how to be producers at all levels, not just at the bottom being consumers.”

Prof. Wm Jackson

Stated in the TEDx, “Africa Post-Colonial Development: Fatoumata Waggeh at TEDxGallatin” Africa must invest in herself and not allow foreign countries dictate the priorities of her people. No foreign country can understand the vision for another country
and make the necessary changes to create generational wealth, progress and build all around stability.”

Nations that do not invest in the growth of their children generational run the risk to not developing into productive nations with thriving economies, they rely on foreign investors and fall back into colonized ideologies and economic slavery.

The educational levels of citizens is one of the important factors that plays into if a nation will be able to be involved in global trade, technological innovation, the education of its
people and even influence the political stability of that nation.

Africans have a unique vision for change that can be applied to many African communities across their respective nations. Listening to writers and activists on YouTube that have influenced not just thousands, but millions in South Africa, Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria and
across the continent of Africa. There are important thought leaders

There are important thought leaders and entrepreneurs with progressive ideas and skills.

Wole Soyinka and Chinua Achebe share their passions to improving their nation’s strength in areas of national educational accessibility, political stability, growth in commerce, the participation in global trade and applying technology to best serve the poor and underserved. To effectively engage and empower with education is a key priority as
each generation moves towards entrepreneurship, youth and teens are developing into smart creatives and technological innovators.

The careers of African societies are no longer just agriculture and industrial they are progressively being adapted to knowledge application, tech innovation and research and development. Technology has the potential to reach millions to provide resources and new opportunities of learning and workings to provide the necessary things families need. The discussion of colonization by foreign rule can never stop because the consequences are still seen today.

Technology has the potential to reach millions to provide resources and new opportunities of learning and workings to provide the necessary things families need. The discussion of colonization by foreign rule can never stop because the consequences are still seen today.

Technology has the potential to reach millions to provide resources and new opportunities for learning and workings to provide the necessary things families need. The discussion of colonization by foreign rule can never stop because the consequences are still seen today.


“Getting things done is better than having things perfect. Done is better than perfect. Whatever you have in your hands, get going with it. Just do it.”

Charles Igwe

Colonization was designed to keep Africans “under” educated, lacking in political power and even possessing little or no economic foundation to build wealth and stability.

Africans must continue to apply their passions, abilities, and talents to help their communities growing through education to make transformative changes using literature, writing, and the integration of technical resources.

Resources:

The Importance of Banks and Banking in Africa: https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

Bridging the African Diaspora Bridging the Diaspora Divide – Teresa H. Clarke at TEDxEuston: https://youtu.be/sg6F-M6v1iM

Africa Post-Colonial Development: Fatoumata Waggeh at TEDxGallatin: https://youtu.be/s7lmz4UL4wE

Instagram for Ideas Lane Africa: https://www.instagram.com/ideaslaneafrica/

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William Jackson is a graduate of South Carolina State University 1985 Earning a Bachelors Degree in Education, currently a proud educators of 32 years. Earned a Masters Degree from Webster University Masters in Educational Technology, Social Media and STEAM. William is a national and international blogger, speaker, and community activist involved in WordCamp conferences nationally and internationally. Employed with Duval County Public Schools and past professor with Edward Waters College from 2004 to 2017. A Content Creator, Digital Innovator, Blogger, Educator and Influencer, he has over 10,000 digital impressions a week through his social media platforms and his Brand - My Quest To Teach Recognized and respected as a published blogger and international traveler.