Central State University will undergo $20 million in renovations to make the campus more energy efficient.

The university looks to add interior and exterior lighting, building automation, mechanical upgrades, roof improvements and implement water conservation. The end result is expected to cut energy consumption 41 percent for utility savings of $1 million a year.

The renovation costs will be paid for through financing from the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority.

Among the major renovations will be a conversion of the steam plant — which provides heat to 23 buildings — to run on 14 hot water boilers tied into an automated system for climate control across campus. Automated climate control with sensors to detect room occupancy and adjust room temperature will be installed, and major energy or water-reducing equipment replacements will be made in buildings serving the Center for Education and Natural Sciences, Smith College of Business and Natatorium.

Other upgrades include LED lights, as well as repairs and replacements of window and door sealant and roofing.

The university is aiming for a 20 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption, as mandated by Ohio House Bill 251. It also says there will be a total guaranteed savings of $14.5 million over the 15 years the improvements will take place.

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Tommy G. Meade Jr.
Tommy G. Meade Jr. is the editor-in-chief of HBCU Buzz, the leading source of HBCU news, where he writes on a wide variety of topics, from HBCU culture and entertainment, sports and technology to black college history, Greek life, politics and the African diaspora. Formerly, he was a Staff Writer of HBCU Buzz and a corps member at City Year. His work has appeared in Black Enterprise, and on other leading HBCU outlets. He is an alum of Central State University and is a proud member Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc. He lives in Columbus.