Lincoln University Goes Pink For LU Alumna Liz Morrow

The dynamic of Lincoln University of Missouri shifted on December 10, 2017, when Liz Morrow shared on her social media that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. Although not being able to be there physically, due to winter break, Lincoln University students and faculty began to send their love and support to Liz Morrow. Everyone was determined to let her know she was not fighting this battle alone.

Liz Morrow, also referred to as Ms. Liz and/or Mama Liz, has been very influential in the culture of Lincoln University. She is a Lincoln University Alumna, a member of the Alpha Iota Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., and currently serves as the Assistant Dean of Students and the University Registrar. In addition, she is also a mentor, confidant, friend, and a mother figure to a plethora of Lincoln University students.

You could always find her somewhere smiling at a sports event, or mostly at the gym and that is why this diagnosis shocked the entire campus; it just didn’t seem like this would happen to her.

“The moment I found out I was devastated, there were tears, I was in denial and I was the first person in my family to be diagnosed. Not having any symptoms made this diagnoses even more of a shock,” said Ms. Liz.

Since being diagnosed with breast cancer, Ms. Liz has been very open with her journey, from sharing her sessions at chemotherapy to her deciding to officially cut her hair. “I want to educate everyone about early detection being the best detection. By sharing my journey, I hope to encourage anyone and everyone who has this disease to fight,” said Ms. Liz when asked why she decided so open during this process.

Lincoln University students have been with Ms. Liz through every step of this journey thus far showing countless amounts of support.

From having a “Pink Out” basketball game dedicated to her and an LU Goes Pink day sponsored the Alpha Iota Chapter, the campus has strived to not only bring awareness to Ms. Liz, but to spread more awareness about breast cancer as well. Ms. Liz was also presented with The Keeper of the Dream Award by the Alpha Psi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. and the Henry T. Asher Award of Achievement by the Rho Eta Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc.

These are just a few things that LU has done to show their appreciation for Ms. Liz.

Here is what LU students are saying below.

Ashton Eadie

“Ms. Morrow is nothing short of what you would call a ‘change agent’. Everyone she comes in contact life is inevitably changed for the better. I’m grateful to know her and I can only pray she knows the love and admiration others feel for her on a daily basis.”

Kristen Wallace

Liz Marrow-Cotton touched my heart the moment I stepped foot on campus and I am forever indebted to her. If it wasn’t for her I would have never known what the word Sisterhood meant. I end with this quote – difficult roads often lead to beautiful destinations.”

Ashton Greene

“She is one of the strongest women I know! She’s helped me through so much with no hesitation and that’s why she will always be my mama Liz.”

Paula Vickers

“When I met ‘Mama Liz’ I was reluctant to call her that at first. At that time, I had lost my mom and didn’t want to just seemingly throw that title around too freely, so I still called her Ms. Liz. As time went on she continually showed me all the things I was physically missing from my own mom. She is strength, courage, excited, loving, forgiving, patient, understanding, and so much more. She is a mama. Even in the midst of her own storms, she has adopted me in, and to witness her strength and faith in God has been a wonderful lesson.”

Kat Langley

“Mama Liz gives me the reassurance that my college journey will be worth it in the end.”

Makayla Adams

“Ms. Liz has motivated me to keep pushing even when I felt like I was going to give up.”

According to breastcancer.org, “In 2018, an estimated 266,120 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S.”

Like Ms. Liz motivates others, let her be your motivation to go get your breast cancer screening. Early detection is the best detection!

To follow Ms. Liz on her journey, you can keep up with her on Facebook: Liz Morrow & Instagram: @alphaiota10.

Maya Brown-Edwards

My name is Maya Brown-Edwards and I am a 20-year-old sophomore at Lincoln University of Missouri where I major in Broadcast Journalism.

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